High Key Photography Tips

without comments

A High key photo is where the majority of the photo is quite bright. Most of the tones fall in the upper-midtones and highlight range, and often a large area of the image will be white or almost white. This type of image can appear quite clean and clinical, or more often, soft and dreamy.

High key images can work well for portraits, product photography, and flower photography. It's not always the best choice for those subjects, but if you want to go for a feeling of delicacy and lightness, then a high key image is a good choice. For landscapes, creating a high key image can be a bit more tricky, but sand and snow scenes can lend themselves well to high key images.

High Key Photography Tips

Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Discover Digital Photography

September 14th, 2014 at 7:48 pm

Posted in Photography Tips

Lighting setups for great portrait photos

without comments

In this article we'll look at four different lighting setups you can use to create beautiful portraits. These techniques all involve using multiple off-camera light sources. For a couple of the techniques you may be able to get away with just using natural light and a reflector, but really these setups work best if you are using controllable light sources such as speedlights or studio lights.

Lighting setups for great portrait photos

Read the rest of this entry »

Rear Sync or Second Curtain Flash Explained

without comments

Rear or second curtain sync flash is a flash mode available on many (though not all) cameras. It is designed for use when you want to combine a slow shutter speed with flash. Unlike the standard flash mode, rear curtain sync flash will fire the flash at the end of the exposure, rather than the start.

In this article we'll take a in-detail look at rear curtain sync flash, looking at how the resulting image differs to standard flash, and why and when you might want to use this flash mode.

Rear Sync / Second Curtain Flash Explained

Read the rest of this entry »

Action figure & toy models photography tips

without comments

Action figure / toy photography is a relatively new genre of photography that has risen in popularity in recent years. Photos often feature well-known characters in unusual situations, or playing characters from different 'universes' off against one another.

In this article we'll look at why you might want to give action figure photography a try, the potential issues you'll come across and how to deal with them, and some tips for getting interesting and engaging photos.

Action figure & toy models photography tips

Read the rest of this entry »

Guide to choosing a tripod

without comments

A tripod can be a great help in getting sharp photos and making you think more carefully about your composition. Many landscape, architecture, and product photographers would rate the tripod as being an essential bit of kit.

But if you're looking at purchasing a tripod, you may be a bit bewildered by all the different options available. In this article we'll look at the various features and specifications of tripods, and how they relate to real life use.

Guide to choosing a tripod

Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Discover Digital Photography

August 17th, 2014 at 2:45 pm

What is EXIF & How is it useful?

without comments

EXIF is a form of metadata (data about data) that is recorded in digital photos. It includes information such as the camera model used to take the photo, the camera settings used, and the date and time the photo was taken.

In this article we'll look at how to view the EXIF data of a photo, how EXIF can be useful, and even how it can help you improve your photography.

What is EXIF & How is it useful?

Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Discover Digital Photography

August 10th, 2014 at 2:30 pm

Summer Photography Tips

without comments

Summer can be a bit of a paradox in terms of its suitability for photography. In one aspect it's great for photography - it's nice weather for going out, there's often lots happening to photograph, and there's plenty of light.

On the other hand, the sun spends a lot of the day high up in the sky, creating harsh lighting and strong shadows. The light is very contrasty and capturing an image with detail in both the shadows and highlights can be nigh-on impossible.

In this article I want to look at how you can deal with the problems of photographing in the summer. I'll also look at some of the good points of summer photography compared to other times of the year.

Summer Photography Tips

Read the rest of this entry »

How to achieve a soft-focus dreamy look

without comments

Soft focus filters are used for reducing the local contrast in an image, and sometimes also for adding a kind of dreamy glow. The main use for this is in portrait photography - the filter reduces the appearance of fine detail such as skin pores, giving a smoothing effect.

The effect is not the same as just blurring an image. A good quality soft focus filter reduces the contrast of fine detail rather than blurring it away.

How to achieve a soft-focus dreamy look

Soft focus effects were often used in Hollywood films in the 1950s for scenes with the leading actress. If you look closely when watching these films you can clearly see how the look of the image changes when a scene alternates between showing the male lead and the female lead.

Because of their heavy use in Hollywood, the look given by a soft focus filter is sometimes referred to as the 'Hollywood look'. In this article we'll look at several ways you can produce the same effect in your own photography.

Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Discover Digital Photography

July 27th, 2014 at 3:01 pm

Improve your photography – Ditch the kit (for a day)

without comments

In this article I want to look at why using a different lens to the one that came with your camera might be a good idea. I'm not going to go into details about the quality of the lens - most 'kit' lenses sold with cameras today are perfectly fine.

Rather, I want to look at how restricting yourself to using a lens or focal length you don't normally use much can help you hone your photographic technique.

Improve your photography - Ditch the kit (for a day)

Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Discover Digital Photography

July 20th, 2014 at 5:10 pm

Create a Hand-Colored Black and White Photo

without comments

Before the advent of color photography, a process of hand coloring black and white photos was sometimes used. Color (often using watercolors) was simply painted on top of the photograph, to create a color image.

This process gives the images quite a unique look. In this article I want to look at how you can do the same, giving any image that hand-colored black and white photo look.

Create a Hand-Colored Black and White Photo

Read the rest of this entry »