What to look for when buying a Speedlight Flash: Exposure modes

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Continuing on from the first article on choosing a speedlight flash, in this article we'll look at the various exposure modes available on different speedlight models. Some speedlights will feature all of these modes, others just one.

By understanding the different exposure modes, you can see which one(s) will be most useful, or even essential, for your photography, and ensure that any speedlight you consider features that mode.

What to look for when buying a Speedlight Flash - Part 2: Exposure modes

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Written by Discover Digital Photography

February 7th, 2016 at 7:19 am

What to look for when buying a Speedlight Flash: Power

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Just like buying a new camera or lens, buying a speedlight flash can be quite confusing given the large number of different models from different manufacturers, across a wide variety of price points. Why do some speedlights cost 10x more than other models? And are the extra benefits offered by more expensive speedlights actually worth the extra cost for your photography?

Over the next few articles, we'll look at the different features Speedlights can offer, and why those features may or may not matter to you. A feature that's very important to a wedding photographer may not be important at all to a product photographer, for example. This should then help you in determining what model of speedlight will give you the best value for money for the way you like to work.

In this first article we'll look at the power (maximum light output) and recycle time, and why they could be important features for your photography.

What to look for when buying a Speedlight Flash: Part 1 - Power

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Written by Discover Digital Photography

January 31st, 2016 at 8:44 am

Do and Don’ts of Adobe Lightroom

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Author: Sleeklens

When working with Digital Post Production, we can find several solutions to use as our prime software; however, it is a widely accepted fact that Adobe Lightroom is the industry’s standard for photography postproduction software.

Born as a spin-off project by Adobe, from its close relative Adobe Photoshop, Lightroom has all of what’s needed and more for accomplishing a quality edit. From the very first moment we plug our memory card into the PC with the exported image, Lightroom will provide us a neat, comfortable environment to enhance our images; however, we need to know which elements can seriously affect not only our end result but also the time spent on our postproduction workflow.

Let’s go through some of the do and don’ts of Adobe Lightroom, to take your postproduction workflow to the next level!

Do and Don'ts of Adobe Lightroom

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Written by Guest

January 24th, 2016 at 9:18 pm

Complete Guide to Neutral Density filters – Part 4 Problems & Solutions

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While neutral density filters can help you capture photos or video that wouldn't otherwise be possible, they do bring with them their own set of issues you need to watch out for. This is particularly true for the stronger neutral density filters.

In this article we'll go through a variety of issues you should look out for when using your ND filter, and when deciding what ND filter to purchase. We'll also look at how to best prevent or at least minimize any problems using an ND filter can give.

Complete Guide to Neutral Density filters - Part 4 Problems & Solutions

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Complete Guide to Neutral Density filters – Part 3: Using ND filters

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You might think that using an ND filter is simple - just attach it to the end of your camera's lens, right? Well, in actual use there is more to it than that, especially with stronger neutral density filters. In this article (and the next one) we'll look at some tips on using ND filters to get the results you want.

Complete Guide to Neutral Density filters – Part 3: Using ND filters

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Written by Discover Digital Photography

January 10th, 2016 at 9:47 pm

Complete Guide to Neutral Density filters – Part 2: Types & Strengths explained

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Neutral density filters are available in a range of different strengths, types, and mounts. Different manufacturers may rate their ND filters in different ways, which can make make it quite confusing when you're looking for a specific strength filter. In this article we'll look at what the different ratings actually mean, and types and mounts available, so you can make a more informed choice when deciding what ND filter to purchase.

Complete Guide to Neutral Density filters – Part 2: Types & Strengths explained

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Written by Discover Digital Photography

January 3rd, 2016 at 9:26 pm

Complete Guide to Neutral Density filters – Part 1: What are they used for?

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Neutral density filters are like sunglasses for your camera. They reduce the amount of light that your camera receives. They can be very useful for long exposure photography, recording video in bright sunlight, and when you want to use flash in a location that is already brightly lit.

Over the next four articles we'll look at the different densities and mounts of ND filter that are available, how best to use them, and potential problems to look out for. To start off with, in this article we'll cover some of the ways ND filters can be useful for photography and videography.

Complete Guide to Neutral Density filters – Part 1: What are they used for?

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Written by Discover Digital Photography

December 27th, 2015 at 8:27 pm

How to give your photos a painted soft dreamy look

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I recently came across the work of photographer Hiroshi Kamakura, and was intrigued by the unusual style of his photography. He has photographed ordinary everyday objects and scenes, using an old compact camera, then processed the resulting images to give a soft painted look to them.

Unfortunately, other than a few old articles on the web, I wasn't able to find out very much about Hiroshi Kamakura or the processing technique he uses. However, there are a couple of techniques that give similar results, which I'll share in this article.

How to give your photos a painted soft dreamy look

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Written by Discover Digital Photography

December 20th, 2015 at 9:12 am

Achieving a spotlight effect when photographing products on black plexiglass

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While product photos on a plain white background can work very well for many uses, a black background with the product reflected below can give a more high-end, expensive, look to a product. Photographing the product on sheet of glossy black plexiglass / perspex / acrylic is a relatively cheap way to achieve this look.

A common effect used when photographing a product on black is a spotlight highlighting the product. The brightness of the area around the product compared to the darker edges of the image helps draw the viewer's eye towards the product.

While you might think this effect would be achieved by using a spotlight above or below the product, the technique actually relies on a reflection. In this article we'll look more at how to achieve this effect.

Achieving a spotlight effect when photographing products on black plexiglass

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Written by Discover Digital Photography

December 13th, 2015 at 9:08 am

Don’t make these 7 mistakes with flash

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Almost all cameras sold today, whether a phone, compact, or ILC, feature a built-in flash. The few that don't (as well as many that do) often have a hot-shoe for adding a speedlight flash. And many photographers have one or more speedlight flashes they can use when the need arises.

But good use of flash isn't simply letting the camera pop up the flash whenever you're shooting in low light levels. In this article we'll look at seven mistakes people sometimes make regarding flash, and how avoiding these mistakes can help you get better photos.

Don't make these 7 mistakes with flash

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