10 Things Digital Photographers can learn from Film Photographers

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While film photography and digital photography do have a few differences, of course they share a great deal in common. Composition, light, camera settings, and (in many cases) even the way the way the camera is operated are the same whether you're shooting film or digital.

However, there are some things that are not strictly restricted to film photographers, but film shooters tend to think about or deal with much more than digital users. In this article I want to look at ten of these points, and how thinking about / considering these things can improve your digital photography.

10 Things Digital Photographers can learn from Film Photographers

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Written by Discover Digital Photography

August 28th, 2016 at 3:38 pm

Why shoot JPEG?

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Reasonably often in these articles I suggest taking your photos using RAW image format, especially when discussing editing of photos. The same advice is given in many other articles and discussion fora across the web - if you're serious about photography, then you should probably be shooting RAW, not JPEG.

However, like all guidelines in photography, RAW format is not always the best choice. Depending on your photography style and workflow, JPEG format may actually be more suitable than RAW. In this article, then, we'll look at the various benefits of shooting straight JPEGs and avoiding RAW altogether.

Why shoot JPEG?

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Written by Discover Digital Photography

August 21st, 2016 at 9:02 pm

Understanding Tonal Contrast for Better Photos

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Tonal contrast refers to the difference in brightness between different areas of an image. While important for all photography, tonal contrast is particularly important for black and white photography, since there is no color contrast to be had.

Understanding the differences between high and low tonal contrast and the feelings different levels of contrast can contribute to an image are quite important for good photography. In this article we'll look at this in more detail, also covering how you can affect contrast to get the look for your images you want.

Understanding Tonal Contrast for Better Photos

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Written by Discover Digital Photography

August 14th, 2016 at 7:07 am

How to choose Photography Software

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There are a large number of different software packages available aimed at photographers. Deciding which one is right for you can be a tricky business. Different software is good at different things, and the right software for you may not be the right software for another photographer.

So, I'm not going to tell you what the best photography software is, as that depends on you and your workflow. But in this article I'll cover the main points you should consider when looking at photography programs. This will help you evaluate what features are most important for you and which aren't needed, so you can make a more informed choice when deciding what software to go for.

How to choose Photography Software

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Written by Discover Digital Photography

August 7th, 2016 at 10:38 am

Understanding Depth in Photography

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Photographs are 2D captures of our 3D world. Yet we can still understand the form of items in photographs thanks to depth cues. In some cases, such as abstract and trick photography, it may actually be preferred to avoid anything in the photo that indicates depth.

Understanding the different depth cues that can be used in a photo can help you make stronger photos. When you know these cues you can ensure you include them to make an image more '3D', or ensure you don't include them for a flatter '2D' look.

Understanding Depth in Photography

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Written by Discover Digital Photography

July 31st, 2016 at 5:52 pm

Post-processing Tips for Landscapes

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The vast majority of photos look better with some post-processing, and this is particularly true for landscape photos. Often landscapes can come out with colors that look quite dull compared to what we remember, or flat and lacking in contrast. Thankfully, this can be remedied through a bit of careful processing.

You might even want to make more extreme changes, in order to more strongly evoke a feeling with the image, rather than just give an accurate portrayal of what you saw.

In this article we'll cover several post production techniques that can be very useful for landscape photographers. You can use them minimally to enhance what was captured, or make stronger adjustments to completely change the mood of an image. How you use the techniques is up to you.

Post-processing Tips for Landscapes

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Written by Discover Digital Photography

July 24th, 2016 at 7:16 am

Wabi-Sabi Photography – The art of the imperfect

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Wabi-sabi is a Japanese word roughly translating as 'imperfect aged beauty'. It is used to describe a particular philosophy that beauty can be found in the old, the everyday, the imperfect. And that everything is in a state of transition from or to nothingness.

Wabi-sabi photography, then, can be said to be noticing and capturing this beauty, for others to see. Wabi-sabi in photography can be split into 3 main types - photography of the overlooked beauty, photography of worn and weathered beauty, and adding imperfections to staged images to make them seem more real. We'll look at all 3 types in this article.

Wabi-Sabi Photography - The art of the imperfect

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Written by Discover Digital Photography

July 17th, 2016 at 2:23 pm

Taking great photos with your kit lens

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Interchangeable Lens Cameras are often sold in kits containing a basic zoom lens. Because these lenses come with the camera as part of a kit, they are often referred to as 'kit lenses'.

The kit lens depends on the camera, but it is practically always a zoom. Often it is something like an 18-55mm for an APS-C camera, 24-100mm for a full frame camera, or 14-24mm for a m4/3 camera. These are all roughly equivalent.

The kit lens lets you go from wide-angle to short telephoto and everything in between. It's a good all-round general purpose lens.

Often you may read disparaging remarks about kit lenses. For sure, they're not the sharpest lenses around, and they don't have fast apertures for easily creating smooth and creamy out of focus backgrounds. But they're surprisingly useful and can give great results when you play to their strengths.

Taking great photos with your kit lens

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Written by Discover Digital Photography

July 10th, 2016 at 3:15 pm

Flat Lay Photography Guide

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Flat Lay Photography is a style of photography where a group of items are photographed from above, giving a top down view. Items are laid flat on the surface, facing the camera.

Flat lay photographs often have a minimalist aesthetic to them. They work well for showing off a collection of smallish objects and are most commonly used for lifestyle, product & food photography. Sometimes all the items in the photo will be of equal importance. But often there is one main element (such as a food dish or handbag) with extra elements that add to the story (such as ingredients or accessories).

Although flat lay photographs may appear relatively simple, there's more to a good flat image than just laying out a few objects then shooting down on them. In this article we'll look at some tips for creating great flat lay photos.

Flat Lay Photography Guide

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Written by Discover Digital Photography

July 3rd, 2016 at 2:47 pm

Top 10 Photography Tricks

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With the increased availability of photography editing software and the introduction of new, easier to use compositing tools, 'trick' photos have become much more common. Compositing together photos to create a trick photo is not a new technique though - even in the early 20th century photos would be cut up then stuck together to form a new image.

However, trick photography isn't just compositing photos together to make something new. There are plenty of tricks that can be performed right in camera, with no Photoshop wizardry needed at all.

In this article we'll look at 10 different tricks that can be achieved wholly in-camera but usually work best with some post production editing as well.

Top 10 Photography Tricks

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