Posts Tagged ‘Macro photography’

Wimberly Plamp 2 Review

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The plamp is device designed for holding stems of plants steady without crushing them while you photograph the plant. Its name is a contraction of 'plant clamp'. However, it can also be used for other related tasks such as holding a small diffusion panel over the plant, giving you nicer lighting than harsh direct sunlight.

I was kindly sent a Plamp 2 and accessories by Wimberly to review. Having previously used the first version of the Plamp, in this review I'll cover the differences between the two products, and how the Plamp could be useful for your photography.

Wimberly Plamp 2 Review

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Written by Discover Digital Photography

December 12th, 2016 at 12:01 pm

Fun and Creative Photography Techniques to try with your camera

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Whether photography is a hobby for you, or a career, it's highly like that you take photos because you enjoy it. One of the enjoyable aspects of photography is trying out new techniques, and capturing images that show a different view of reality to that you see with your eyes.

In this article I'll share five techniques that are fun, creative, and can result in some great 'out of this world' photos.

Fun and Creative Photography Techniques to try with your camera

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Written by Discover Digital Photography

April 17th, 2016 at 7:44 pm

Introduction to Extreme Macro Photography

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Extreme macro photographs show super close-up views of items, revealing details that cannot be seen by the naked eye, and opening up a new world of subjects.

Standard macro lenses 'only' go to 1:1 or 1:2 magnification. Extreme macro refers to images taken at magnifications greater than 1:1. To get these images requires more than just a standard macro lens, but the equipment doesn't necessarily have to be expensive.

In this article I'll look at some of the options available if you want to be able to capture extreme macro photos. And I'll also cover how to deal with some of the issues that come up when shooting at such high magnifications.

Introduction to Extreme Macro Photography

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Ten things your camera can see that your eyes can’t

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Often in photography, the problem we feel we have is that the photos we take don't match what we saw at the time. The way the camera works is quite different from the human eye. While there is nothing wrong with trying to capture what you saw, have you ever thought about using your camera to capture what you can't see?

In this article I'll cover 10 things that your camera can see but you can't, with an added bonus point at the end. Capturing photos that don't exactly match what you see with your eyes can often give stronger images than just an exact record of reality.

Ten things your camera can see that your eyes can't

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Garden Wildlife Photography Tips

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When you think about wildlife photography, most people would think of visiting a wildlife reserve, national park, or just getting out in the wilds. However, you can take great wildlife photos much closer to home.

Garden Wildlife Photography Tips

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Written by Discover Digital Photography

November 9th, 2014 at 8:04 pm

Fungi and Mushroom Photography Tips

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Fungi don't seem to be as popular a subject as flowers. Maybe it's that they're not so easy to find, or that many of them are quite dull in coloration compared to flowers. Or maybe it's that photographing them often involves getting down in the dirt.

The fact is that fungi do actually make great subjects for photos, and I want to share a few tips on photographing them in this article.

Mushroom Mosaic
Mushroom Mosaic by Red~Star (off & on--taking care of Jasmine) on flickr (licensed CC-BY-SA)

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Written by Discover Digital Photography

October 7th, 2013 at 9:58 am

Macro & Close-up Photography of Insects

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Insects and other creepy-crawlies such as spiders make great subjects for macro photography. When we normally see a fly buzzing around, it just looks like a black blob. But on the macro level it looks very different.

Horsefly portrait
Horsefly portrait by Gilles San Martin on flickr (licensed CC-BY-SA)

Many creatures can have an almost otherworldly look about them when captured up close. In a sense, they are of another world - the macro world.

In this article we'll look at some tips on getting close to insects (and other invertebrates) without scaring them away, finding them, and how to photograph them.

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Macro & Close-up Photography Tips – Plants & Flowers

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Plants and flowers are one of the most popular subjects for macro photography. They are naturally appealing the eye, and can be found easily. Even in winter you can still buy cut flowers to practise your photography skills on indoors.

Rose 7623
Rose 7623 by Kain Kalju on flickr (licensed CC-BY)

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Written by Discover Digital Photography

August 25th, 2013 at 2:53 pm

Macro Photography Using Flash – How To Avoid Black Backgrounds & Harsh Lighting

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In the last couple of articles we've looked at lighting for macro and close-up photos, and the different flash configurations available. In this article I want to look at a couple of problems you are likely to come up against when using flash to light your macro photos. These issues with are black or dark backgrounds, and harsh lighting.

Macro Photography Using Flash – How To Avoid Black Backgrounds & Harsh Lighting

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Written by Discover Digital Photography

August 21st, 2013 at 1:33 pm

Macro & Close-up Photography Tips – Lighting

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Just as with standard photography, getting lighting right for macro photography isn't easy. The main issue is often the lack of light, especially when working at magnifications of 1:1 or above. The extension used by a lens to allow it focus closely, plus any additional extension you add means that not as much light reaches the camera's image sensor.

As well as this factor, you often need to get very close to the subject, which can result in yourself blocking some of the light. And many subjects grow or live in shaded areas, just compounding the lack of light even more.

Bruco di Antheraea Mylitta
Bruco di Antheraea Mylitta by Herman Rhoids on flickr (licensed CC-BY-SA)

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