Posts Tagged ‘close-up photography tips’

Wimberly Plamp 2 Review

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The plamp is device designed for holding stems of plants steady without crushing them while you photograph the plant. Its name is a contraction of 'plant clamp'. However, it can also be used for other related tasks such as holding a small diffusion panel over the plant, giving you nicer lighting than harsh direct sunlight.

I was kindly sent a Plamp 2 and accessories by Wimberly to review. Having previously used the first version of the Plamp, in this review I'll cover the differences between the two products, and how the Plamp could be useful for your photography.

Wimberly Plamp 2 Review

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Written by Discover Digital Photography

December 12th, 2016 at 12:01 pm

Taking Great Flower Photos

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When photographing flowers there are two routes you can take. One is documenting the flower, where the photos show what the flower or parts of the flower look like. The other is to create an artistic image, one whose purpose is to evoke an emotional response rather than present an accurate portrayal of the flower.

Of course, a technical photo of a flower can still be artistic and create an emotional response to it. And an artistic photo may not create an emotional response in everyone who views it. Art is, after all, subjective. But the driving purpose behind the creation of the photograph is quite different.

In this article we'll be looking at flower photography from both points of view, but focusing more on the artistic side.

Taking Great Flower Photos

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Written by Discover Digital Photography

October 25th, 2015 at 1:50 pm

Using a tripod for flower photography

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Some photographers feel a good tripod is essential for their photography. Others don't use one at all, feeling that a tripod encumbers their freedom. Most of us like having one available so that we can use it for certain shots, but don't like having to carry one around with us. Never the less, a tripod can help us capture images we otherwise wouldn't be able to.

In this article I'll look at the pros and cons of using a tripod from the specific point of view of photographing flowers. I'll also cover the features that you should look for in a tripod if you want to use if for flower photography.

Using a tripod for flower photography

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Written by Discover Digital Photography

August 30th, 2015 at 9:36 am

Ten things your camera can see that your eyes can’t

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Often in photography, the problem we feel we have is that the photos we take don't match what we saw at the time. The way the camera works is quite different from the human eye. While there is nothing wrong with trying to capture what you saw, have you ever thought about using your camera to capture what you can't see?

In this article I'll cover 10 things that your camera can see but you can't, with an added bonus point at the end. Capturing photos that don't exactly match what you see with your eyes can often give stronger images than just an exact record of reality.

Ten things your camera can see that your eyes can't

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Action figure & toy models photography tips

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Action figure / toy photography is a relatively new genre of photography that has risen in popularity in recent years. Photos often feature well-known characters in unusual situations, or playing characters from different 'universes' off against one another.

In this article we'll look at why you might want to give action figure photography a try, the potential issues you'll come across and how to deal with them, and some tips for getting interesting and engaging photos.

Action figure & toy models photography tips

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How to build and use a Macro Photography Studio

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Macro photography in a studio setting can be quite rewarding. You have much more control over the scene, being able to easily modify the lighting, background, and move around your subject without anything getting in the way.

How to build and use a macro photography studio
(Based on the image Studio In The RAW: High Key Set-up by Alan Antiporda on flickr, licensed CC-BY)

When I say 'studio setting', I am not talking about a full blown photography studio. I just mean indoors, in a controlled environment. With macro and close-up photography, the top of a small table can be your studio!

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Written by Discover Digital Photography

January 26th, 2014 at 7:10 pm

Macro & Close-up Photography Tips – Lighting

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Just as with standard photography, getting lighting right for macro photography isn't easy. The main issue is often the lack of light, especially when working at magnifications of 1:1 or above. The extension used by a lens to allow it focus closely, plus any additional extension you add means that not as much light reaches the camera's image sensor.

As well as this factor, you often need to get very close to the subject, which can result in yourself blocking some of the light. And many subjects grow or live in shaded areas, just compounding the lack of light even more.

Bruco di Antheraea Mylitta
Bruco di Antheraea Mylitta by Herman Rhoids on flickr (licensed CC-BY-SA)

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How to photograph Dragonflies and Damselflies

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Dragonflies and damselflies, with their bright colors and almost alien appearance, can make great subjects for photos. They can move incredibly quickly, and are often quite skittish, so are not the easiest of subjects. But in this article I'll share a few tips to help you get better Dragonfly and Damselfly photos.

Blue dragonfly sitting on a twig
Deep in the sun-searched growths the dragonfly hangs like a blue thread loosened from the sky. by Krikit ♥ on flickr (licensed CC-BY)

(Mostly in this article I refer to Dragonflies, this is just to save constantly writing Dragonflies and Damselflies all the time. The behavior and tips described in this article apply to both Dragonflies and Damselflies.)

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