Posts Tagged ‘Long exposure photography’

Complete Guide to Neutral Density filters – Part 4 Problems & Solutions

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While neutral density filters can help you capture photos or video that wouldn't otherwise be possible, they do bring with them their own set of issues you need to watch out for. This is particularly true for the stronger neutral density filters.

In this article we'll go through a variety of issues you should look out for when using your ND filter, and when deciding what ND filter to purchase. We'll also look at how to best prevent or at least minimize any problems using an ND filter can give.

Complete Guide to Neutral Density filters - Part 4 Problems & Solutions

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Complete Guide to Neutral Density filters – Part 3: Using ND filters

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You might think that using an ND filter is simple - just attach it to the end of your camera's lens, right? Well, in actual use there is more to it than that, especially with stronger neutral density filters. In this article (and the next one) we'll look at some tips on using ND filters to get the results you want.

Complete Guide to Neutral Density filters – Part 3: Using ND filters

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Written by Discover Digital Photography

January 10th, 2016 at 9:47 pm

Complete Guide to Neutral Density filters – Part 2: Types & Strengths explained

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Neutral density filters are available in a range of different strengths, types, and mounts. Different manufacturers may rate their ND filters in different ways, which can make make it quite confusing when you're looking for a specific strength filter. In this article we'll look at what the different ratings actually mean, and types and mounts available, so you can make a more informed choice when deciding what ND filter to purchase.

Complete Guide to Neutral Density filters – Part 2: Types & Strengths explained

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Written by Discover Digital Photography

January 3rd, 2016 at 9:26 pm

Complete Guide to Neutral Density filters – Part 1: What are they used for?

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Neutral density filters are like sunglasses for your camera. They reduce the amount of light that your camera receives. They can be very useful for long exposure photography, recording video in bright sunlight, and when you want to use flash in a location that is already brightly lit.

Over the next four articles we'll look at the different densities and mounts of ND filter that are available, how best to use them, and potential problems to look out for. To start off with, in this article we'll cover some of the ways ND filters can be useful for photography and videography.

Complete Guide to Neutral Density filters – Part 1: What are they used for?

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Written by Discover Digital Photography

December 27th, 2015 at 8:27 pm

Ten things your camera can see that your eyes can’t

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Often in photography, the problem we feel we have is that the photos we take don't match what we saw at the time. The way the camera works is quite different from the human eye. While there is nothing wrong with trying to capture what you saw, have you ever thought about using your camera to capture what you can't see?

In this article I'll cover 10 things that your camera can see but you can't, with an added bonus point at the end. Capturing photos that don't exactly match what you see with your eyes can often give stronger images than just an exact record of reality.

Ten things your camera can see that your eyes can't

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How to use bulb mode for long exposure photography

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Bulb mode is a special shooting mode that will let you take really long exposures. It allows you to keep the camera's shutter open for as long as you like (or until the camera's battery runs out). You're not likely to find it as feature of most point & shoot cameras, but it can be found on most more advanced cameras.

Camera LCD displaying 'bulb' as the shutter speed

Most cameras that feature bulb mode allow up to 30 second exposure times in normal modes. This is more than enough for most situations. During the daytime a typical exposure time will be around 1/500s to 1/160s, a pretty quick shutter speed. But if you're out in the middle of nowhere at night, then a shutter speed of over 30 seconds may be necessary.

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Written by Discover Digital Photography

February 22nd, 2013 at 11:39 am

Create a spark filled photo with steel wool

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You can create surreal spark filled photos by burning steel wool during a long exposure photograph. In this article we'll look at what's involved to get great photos like this:

Wheel of sparks from spinning burning steel wool
Black Materia by joo0ey on flickr (licensed CC-BY)

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Written by Discover Digital Photography

December 23rd, 2012 at 12:28 pm

Waterfall Photography tips

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Waterfalls can range from giant thundering torrents to small serene cascades, with everything in between as well. They can make for great photographic subjects, and this article I'll share some tips on photographing waterfalls to make them look their best.

Yellow fall leaves and waterfall
Yellow by Ian Sane on flickr (licensed CC-BY)

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Written by Discover Digital Photography

April 15th, 2012 at 9:35 am

Light Painting How To

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Light painting is the process of manually lighting a photo during a long exposure, often using a torch or small LED lights. There are two types of light painting photography. One is where you shine the light onto your subject, I have covered this previously in How to use light painting for flower photography. In this article, we'll look at how to do light painting where you use the light source as the actual subject of the photo, painting the light into the air.

Light painting around a painting
Painting the City by StandUPP on flickr (licensed CC-BY)

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Spooky Halloween Photography Tips

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Here are some tips to help you get some spooky photos for Halloween.

Light from below

Try lighting your subject from below. We are used to seeing photos where the subject is lit from above, so lighting from below appears very unnatural. You can ask your subject to hold a torch / flashlight at their waist and point it up towards their face to achieve this effect.

Spooky up-lit portrait photo
No, seriously. by David McLeish on flickr (licensed CC-BY-SA)

If you have a flash unit / speedlight, you can mount it on the camera and then use the camera upside down to bounce the flash off the floor and up into your subject's face. Or if you also have a flash sync cord, then you can hold the camera the right way up with one hand, and hold the flash pointing up at your subject's face with the other hand.

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Written by Discover Digital Photography

October 11th, 2011 at 3:15 pm