Posts Tagged ‘DSLR’

How does the zoom of a superzoom camera compare to a DSLR?

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When considering a new camera, you may be looking at a superzoom (sometimes known as a bridge) camera, and comparing it to a DSLR or other interchangeable lens camera. Superzooms and consumer DSLRs are often similarly priced.

The specs for the superzoom might show it as having a 24-1200mm equivalent zoom. But you can't buy a lens with this specification for the DSLR.

The DSLR might come with an 18-55mm lens, so that covers the wide end (roughly) equivalent to the superzoom. But how about that long end? Nope, it seems like you can't buy a 1200mm lens for a DSLR. Well, maybe you'll have to settle for a 600mm lens instead. But then you notice the price - as much as a small car.

So, why is a DSLR with equivalent lenses so much larger and more expensive than a superzoom camera? And why would anyone purchase a DSLR over a superzoom?

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Written by Discover Digital Photography

September 1st, 2013 at 2:58 pm

Lens jargon – Lens names explained

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If you own an interchangeable lens camera and are looking at purchasing a new lens, you may wonder what all those different numbers and letters that form part of the lens name mean. Or you may just be wondering what they mean on your current lens / camera.

Lens jargon - Lens names and nomenclature explained

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Written by Discover Digital Photography

July 4th, 2013 at 8:45 am

Macro & Close-up Photography using Diopters and Coupled Lenses

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Diopter or close-up lenses are a good way to add macro / close-up ability to your current photography gear. They work by screwing or clipping on to the front of your camera's lens, and decrease the minimum focusing distance. This allows you to move your camera closer to the subject, and achieve higher magnification photos.

Livin' on the edge
Livin' on the edge by Fountain_Head on flickr (licensed CC-BY)

These close-up lenses work with all cameras where the lens has a filter thread. So they will work with virtually all interchangeable lens camera lenses, and most bridge and advanced compact cameras that have built-in lenses. With some cameras that have an integrated lens, you may need to purchase an accessory tube that attaches to the lens to provide a filter thread that the close-up lens can then be screwed into.

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Macro & Close-up Photography using Extension Tubes & Bellows

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Continuing our look at different methods for capturing macro and close-up photographs, in this article I want to look at extension tubes and bellows. Both of these methods are only applicable for cameras with interchangeable lenses, as they sit between the lens and the camera.

They both work the same way, by extending the lens away from the camera body, the minimum focusing distance of the lens decreases. You can then get closer to your subject, and get some great macro photos.

Emerge
Emerge by aussiegall on flickr (licensed CC-BY)

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Written by Discover Digital Photography

April 2nd, 2013 at 5:39 pm

Macro & Close-up Photography using Macro Lenses

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If you have an interchangeable lens camera, you can purchase a macro lens for your camera. A macro lens allows you to focus much closer (and so obtain greater magnification) than a standard lens.

Thorny Pettle
Thorny Pettle by the_tahoe_guy on flickr (licensed CC-BY)

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Written by Discover Digital Photography

March 24th, 2013 at 12:09 pm

Digital Camera Types Explained – DSLRs and SLTs

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This article is part of a series on the various different types of cameras available today.

DSLRs

DSLR stands for Digital Single Lens Reflex. The 'Single Lens' part of the name refers to the fact that the viewfinder looks through the same lens that is used to take the photo (as opposed to a TLR).

Canon EOS 5D Mark III 22.3 MP Full Frame CMOS Digital SLR Camera with EF 24-105mm f/4 L IS USM Lens

The 'Reflex' part of the name meanwhile, refers to the mirror that is used to reflect the light up into the camera's viewfinder. (Actually, the light is reflected up into a pentaprism, which then reflects the light into the viewfinder - the pentaprism is what causes the viewfinder hump on DSLR bodies).

Normally the mirror is in front of the camera's sensor, but when you press the shutter button the mirror flips up out of the way, so that the sensor can be exposed. When this happens, no light can be reflected into the viewfinder, which is known as viewfinder blackout.

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Written by Discover Digital Photography

January 7th, 2012 at 2:57 pm

Extend your digital camera’s battery life

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Modern digital cameras tend to have very good long lasting batteries. However, if you are out somewhere special all day taking photos, you don't want the camera battery to die just as it comes to the beautiful light of sunset.

Extend your digital camera's battery life

So here are a few ways you can make your existing battery last longer, as well as options you can purchase for longer lasting power.

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Travelling Light with Photo Gear

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Author: Andy Lim

A question that most people would ask when packing for a vacation is "how much gear should I bring?". If you bring too little, you may fear you'll miss out on a photo opportunity. On the other hand, you would not want to lug 6kg of photo gear during a vacation (that's the amount of gear I carry for 10 hours at a wedding). Over the years, I have tried out many different variations in my quest for lighter loads during a vacation. This is especially crucial when you not only have to carry your camera gear, but a baby and shopping bags as well. All the parents out there will know what I mean.

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Written by Andy Lim

August 27th, 2011 at 3:45 pm

Choosing and packing photography equipment for a holiday

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Choosing what photography gear to take on holiday with you can be a difficult job. You will likely need to make some trade-offs between bringing the equipment to get the best photo for each situation you may come across, to just bringing enough gear to produce good results in most situations.

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Written by Discover Digital Photography

March 23rd, 2011 at 1:44 pm